Mastering Hard Light

Mastering Hard Light

The pseudo-renaissance architecture scattered through Berkeley was subjected to harsh, noontime sunlight. Shafts of gold flickered through windows and every limestone façade was thrown into harsh relief. Vertical borders between light and dark served as a physical representation of the clock striking noon. Outside the comfort of shade, the sun was sweating. As it reached the highest point of its arc, the light was increasingly penetrating.

But the stronger the sun, the darker the shade. What lies in the liminal space, the abrupt gradient, between sunlight and shadow? Perhaps nothing; the sun affects our perception more than the surfaces it actually touches.

My eye is drawn to such spaces of hard transition and crisp line. The lines that are cast upon the natural structure of our faces emphasize them, by carving an architectural intensity into planes that are otherwise muted. This set examines these hard dimensions.